How to Notice Signs of Cataracts in Your Pets

Cataracts can develop in any dog due to aging, but it’s not a disease that only affects elderly dogs. Just as in humans, cataracts affect the lens of the eye. The lens becomes thick and opaque over time, and it becomes very difficult for a dog to see. This condition can develop quickly or slowly, and it is most commonly brought on as the result of genetics. Diabetic dogs seem to develop cataracts more frequently.
How to Notice Signs of Cataracts in Your Pets

Any dog owner knows that, over time, watching for decline heath due to aging becomes important. Ensuring that our canine friends are happy and healthy well into the future means keeping an eye on them. Eye conditions become more frequent as dogs mature into adulthood.

Cataracts can develop in any dog due to aging, but it’s not a disease that only affects elderly dogs. Just as in humans, cataracts affect the lens of the eye. The lens becomes thick and opaque over time, and it becomes very difficult for a dog to see. This condition can develop quickly or slowly, and it is most commonly brought on as the result of genetics. Diabetic dogs seem to develop cataracts more frequently.

It is imperative that you look for early signs of cataracts so that you can respond quickly with medical care. Your dog might start to move in a clumsy manner, or may have difficulty seeing things in front of them. Dogs with cataracts may be reluctant to jump up or down from the furniture or may refuse to climb the stairs. More telling signs are bluish or greyish discoloration on the eye, scratching or itching, or increased eye discharge. While it’s normal that dogs over 7 years old experience some lens changes, any noticeable cloudiness or major discoloration might warrant attention.

A quick trip to the vet should be arranged so that you can rule out any other causes for the symptoms. Cataracts are sometimes the result of an underlying condition, and once the condition is treated, prognosis improves. Some dogs are candidates for surgery, but if your dog is not, know that there are ways to make living a full, happy life easier for your canine companion. In any case, if you notice any of these symptoms or behaviors, call your vet as soon as possible.

Once a diagnosis occurs, your vet will likely provide you with plenty of information, and you will need to monitor your pet for worsening symptoms or ongoing treatments. Like you, we love our dogs, and we believe they are a part of the family. Angel Eyes offers a full line of products for tear stains and discoloration around the eyes. Visit our site for more information about our tear-stain removal products, as well as stories, photos, and advice about puppies and dogs: Visit our site for more information.

How to Care for a Puppy that Destroys Things

Caring for your pets requires patience, but the rewards are great. Like you, we adore our canine friends and the Angels' Eyes team strives to make your dog happy and healthy.
How To Care For A Puppy That Destroys Things

It has happened to most dog owners. You bring your adorable puppy home for the first time and things seem fine at first. Then, suddenly, you wake up to utter chaos. Your precious pooch has chewed his or her way through cords, carpets, clothing, shoes, blankets, and has left a trail of toilet paper all around your home!

After dealing with this for a few days, you are at your limit. You wonder if this is normal behavior. Should you consult your vet or another dog owner? Should you rely on Internet searches for explanations and tips? Perhaps your puppy requires obedience training?

Before you run to the vet in a panic or invest time and lots of money with a trainer, there are some basic facts to know about puppies that destroy things.

You will be relieved to find out that chewing is perfectly normal and common behavior for puppies. Puppies often get bored and restless, and chewing on anything relieves the boredom. Perhaps more serious (but also common) is chewing because of separation anxiety or a desire for attention. You may notice that leaving your canine friend alone for too long seems to spur chewing. Puppies will often gnaw on anything in sight to deal with an absent owner, too.

It is also important to remember that puppies between 3 and 6 months of age could be teething. This is also normal, but destructive. Puppies who are teething are known to take a chomp out of anything, even a dangling finger, so be careful during this timeframe! You should also know that this is temporary and that most will outgrow this annoying behavior when their teething processes are complete.

There are some simple solutions. The goal to keep in mind is that puppies will chew, the key is to get them to chew on the right items (and not necessarily your fingers or your brand new area rug). Providing ample chew toys and leaving them scattered around their play area is a great first step. A teething puppy can benefit from toys made specifically for relieving this type of pain. Any pet store should have a decent selection of teething toys.

Another great idea is to puppy-proof your home. You will have to adjust for life with a puppy. In short, you’ll have to ensure that your valuables and personal items are picked up regularly. Move frequently chewed items up off the floor, if possible. Keep doors shut. Secure electrical cords up high, or tuck them behind furniture. This will give your puppy less to chew on and the opportunity to find his or her new chew toys.

If your puppy still seems to gnaw on everything, it might be time to increase daytime activity or socialize your pet. A tired puppy might be less inclined to nervously chew on household items, so frequent walks, trips to a dog park, or even letting him or her play with a friend’s dog might be just the ticket. If your puppy behaves well, or if you experience decreased chewing, reward them! Positive reinforcement is important.

Caring for your pets requires patience, but the rewards are great. Like you, we adore our canine friends and the Angels’ Eyes team strives to make your dog happy and healthy. Visit Angels’ Eyes online for more information about our tear-stain removal products, as well as stories, photos, and advice about puppies and dogs.

Caring for Pets in Extreme Weather Conditions

Caring for Pets in Extreme Weather Conditions. Angels' Eyes is here for you and your pet!

With Hurricane Season in full swing and the cold, blizzard-filled Winter just around the corner, it’s important to know how to best care for your pets in these extreme weather situations. Here are a few tips to ensure your pet stays safe and healthy in any weather event.

Hurricanes

Hurricanes can bring strong, damaging winds and flood-producing rain. Caring for your pets starts by having a strong emergency plan. Stock up on food, water, and medication to last at least three weeks. Check with your vet about enrolling your pet in a recovery database, as well as getting your pet microchipped. Get an updated record of the health and vaccinations of your pet, and make sure your pet is up to date on all shots. Even if your pet is microchipped, they should wear a collar with a rabies vaccination tag and an ID tag that includes your cell phone number.

If evacuation is required, be sure where you are staying will welcome your furry friend. Many shelters do not allow pets, so make sure to look for one that is pet-friendly.

Winter

You may be ready for winter, but is your pup? Winter storms can take a toll on both pet and owner. With cold winds, slippery sleet, and snow to shovel, the winter can be anything but fun for a human. As for pets, the winter can be tolerable (They have that warm fur coat after all) but there are a few precautions you should take to ensure they are safe and comfortable through the colder months.

Gear

Just as you need to pull on your gloves, boots, hat, and coat, pets could use a little extra warmth as well when going outside. If your pup has short hair, a sweater can be helpful on the coldest days to help keep him warm. Little boots can be purchased for dogs to keep their feet warm and off the damaging ice during walks. Boots can also help minimize the amount of salt and other snow melting chemicals get on your pet’s feet. Snow-melting salt and antifreeze can hurt your pup’s sensitive feet and can be toxic if ingested. Make sure you rinse your dog’s feet after a winter walk. Stock up on food and medicine as well as fun activities for your pets as it will be difficult, if not impossible to venture out during a snow storm.

In some states, it may even be illegal to improperly care for your pet in extreme weather. State legislators in Pennsylvania recently passed a law that would make it illegal to leave dogs tied up for longer than 30 minutes if it is colder than 32 degrees Fahrenheit or warmer than 90 degrees.

Of course, you would never purposely mistreat your beloved furry friend. Follow these tips, and your pet will be happy and safe in any weather.

Angels’ Eyes has many more tips for caring for your pets. For more information visit our Products page.

Traveling with Your Pet During the Holidays

Pets can make great travel buddies if their needs are properly met. Here are a few Pet Care tips from Angels’ Eyes on how to take your pet while traveling.

Hitting the road for the Holidays? Don’t leave your puppy behind. Dogs can make great travel buddies if their needs are properly met. Of course, you will need to make the trip as safe and comfortable as possible for both you and your fluffy passenger. Here are a few Pet Care tips from Angels’ Eyes on how to take your pup while traveling.

Before the Trip

First, make sure your destination and hotel are pet-friendly. Call ahead to confirm pet policies and ensure you and your dog will be welcome as well as comfortable. Pack food and water bowls, doggie beds and toys. Double check that you’ve packed all of your dog’s supplies, especially essential items such as food, medications, and leashes. It’s also wise to bring along your dog’s vaccination records just in case.

It’s always a good idea to take your dog to the vet prior to your trip to ensure they’re in good health and fit to travel. Research local veterinarians in your destination city ahead of your trip so that contact information and directions will be easily accessible in the event of an emergency.

Driving

Driving may be the most convenient and cost friendly way to travel with your pet. Purchase a car seat or harness for your dog from your local pet store to ensure your pet’s safety as well as your own for the duration of the journey. It is important that your pet stays in their own seat, so they don’t interfere with your driving.

If you’ve never taken your dog on a long road trip, be sure to take him or her for a test drive of at least an hour to see how they react. If they become too anxious or show signs of stress you and your dog are likely better off with your pet staying home.

Plan ahead to anticipate breaks for your pet every few hours. Factor those stops into your route and leave yourself a little bit of extra time. Never feed your dog right before a road trip. Instead, feed them a few hours prior so they’ve had time to let it settle.

Flying

Not all carriers allow pets, but if you search around you can find a few that do. Buy your tickets and register your dog with your airline early, as many carriers have a maximum number of pets that can travel aboard any one flight. Also, make sure to check on crate or carrier dimensions and have as much identifying information as possible on both carrier and collar—including your home and destination addresses.

Take your dog for a relaxing walk before arriving at the terminal. Leave ample time for your travels so that you’re not stressed out—That feeling can easily transfer to your furry travel buddy. Don’t overdo it with snacks before the flight, as dogs can be prone to upset stomachs if they’re not used to flying. Avoid giving your dog medication to calm down, especially if they’re flying in cargo.

Now that you know how to take care of your pet on the road, you’ll have a happy companion throughout your holiday travels. For more Pet Care Tips, read more in the Angels’ Eyes blog. And to ensure that your furry friend looks their best, check out our award-winning products!

The Effects Plants May Have On Dogs

Ever caught your dog acting strange? Perhaps in the presence of plants? Knowing the effects of plants on your pup is an important part of caring for your dog. While some plants may be poisonous, even the harmless ones can cause your dog to react. Some dogs go into a slow-moving meditation-like state when they come in contact with any plant. This slow-motion movement is known as “trancing”—sometimes called ghost-walking—and remains an unexplainable behavior in dogs. Read on to learn more! Have you ever caught your dog acting strange? Perhaps in the presence of plants? Knowing the effects of plants on your pup is an important part of caring for your dog. While some plants may be poisonous, even the harmless ones can cause your dog to react.

Some dogs go into a slow-moving meditation-like state when they come in contact with any plant. This slow-motion movement is known as “trancing”—sometimes called ghost-walking—and remains an unexplainable behavior in dogs.

This response to plants is most common in bull terriers and greyhounds. But it has also been reported with Salukis, Basset Hounds, Whippet, Jack Russell, Labrador, Irish Setter, Cane Corso, Cavalier, Australian Cattle Dog, and Puggle.

Experts are not completely sure why this behavior occurs, but it’s not believed to harmful. Some experts think this psychedelic state just feels good for the dogs. It may also just be the relaxing effects of plants. Dog owners report seeing glazed-over eyes, but once the dog snaps out of this state, it resumes normal activity as if nothing has happened.

Sometimes the reaction seems to start when a plant or other hanging objects like a curtain or tablecloth lightly grazes the dog’s back. This causes the dog to move in a slow-motion creep as if they were in a trance. Just search “dog trancing” on YouTube and you’ll get plenty of examples.

When owners first witness trancing, they may think the dog is having a medical problem.  While the behavior remains mostly unexplained, dog owners should not be alarmed by trancing. It has not been found to be connected with any neurological or psychological issues.

Some dogs can go into such deep trances that they do not respond to calls and whistles from their owners. Some may even become agitated when you try to break them out of the trance. It’s not the scent that appears to trigger dog trancing, as various dogs choose different types of bushes, and some prefer hanging clothes. Some even prefer odder things, but most have in common something that hangs down and lightly touches them.

The good news is, tracing usually only lasts a few minutes. If your dog experiences trancing, just think of it as another quirk in your pup’s behavior. It is smart to keep plants away from dogs in general, in case they are poisonous. If you need more information on caring for your dog, visit the Angels’ Eyes Blog.

Splash Away the Summer with These Water Safety Tips for Dogs!

The sun is shining, and the weather is nice. Time for you and your favorite pooch to get out and play. Most dogs love swimming and playing in water, but if you’re not careful, it can create a dangerous situation for your pet. Follow these guidelines to help keep your pup safe in the water.

General Water Safety

Seawater, minerals, salt, chlorine, algae, and pollution can be harsh on puppy’s skin and fur. Be sure to dry your dog’s ears completely to prevent an infection. Try an ear cleaner that has a drying agent in it like the Coastal Breeze Ear Rinse from Angel’s Eyes.

Teach Your Dog to Swim

Take your pup from puddle to pool. If your dog loves splashing around, he will probably love going for a dip in a larger body of water. But not all dogs are natural born swimmers. Build your pooch’s swimming skills by gradually teaching him the basics. Start off in shallow water, in a quiet spot with minimal distractions. Keep your dog’s leash on at first for extra security. You may have to get in the water with him to make him feel more comfortable.

If he doesn’t want to go in, don’t force him. The water isn’t for all dogs. With a few more trips, your dog may get used to the water.

Fun at The Beach

Puppies love sun, surf, and sand as much as humans too. While not all beaches allow dogs, the ones that do can be a great place to get some outdoor time with your dog. Unfortunately, the beach also comes with its own set of hazards. Watch out for strong currents and rip tides which can be very dangerous for both you and your dog.

Ocean water and debris can make your dog sick. You should keep your dog away from fish that have washed up to shore, they can make a dog very ill. It’s best to pack snacks and fresh water for your dog to enjoy while you’re out.

Playing in the Pool

Does your dog like to dive into your backyard pool? While a splash in the pool can be great exercise for your dog, you will want to keep a close eye on him to make sure he does so safely.

First, you should put a fence around your pool to keep your dog out when it isn’t time to swim. If you use a cover on your pool, make sure the material lets rainwater drip through. Dogs can drown in the puddles that form on top of pool covers.

Make sure there are steps or a ramp to help your dog get in and out. Take time to show your dog where and how to safely enter and exit the pool.

Rivers, Lakes, and Ponds

Rivers and creeks have currents too, make sure they are not too strong before letting your dog in. If you’re going out on a boat, make sure your dog wears a life jacket. Also, avoid water if you see blue-green algae. It can make your dog sick.

With these tips, you are all set to enjoy a safe and fun-filled summer with your pooch. Visit www.angelseyesonline.com for more tips and advice about caring for your dog.